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Monday, 30 June 2014

Destination Inspriation - Distress Paint Marbling

Hi everyone, S@ndy here, I'm happy to be with you today to share a few tips about Tim’s paint marbling techniques for backgrounds.  We have had requests here at A Vintage Journey from our readers for this Destination Inspiration—so this one is for you!!  I hope you find it helpful. 

First thing I want to say is that this technique does take some (very little) practice so don’t give up, practice does make perfect, or as close as you can get. 

I like to use three or four colors and there really isn’t any special way to put them down on your craft sheet.  It can be straight lines of paint or squiggly lines.   Here are a couple ways I prefer and have had good results.

I suggest that you have a stack of tags ready to use while doing this technique.  There is always paint left on the mat when you're done with the first tag and although we all seem to have enough supplies to last a life time we never like to waste.
 

For the this demonstration I am going to use the same three colors so you can see the difference in the technique.  This is one of my favorite color combinations since I'm very fond of orange.  I have used Peeled Paint, Rusty Hinge and Mustard Seed.
I always have water handy & I like the Mini Misters from Ranger because the spray is even and not too heavy.  You can place the colors next to each other or leave some space as I have done. 
 

Here you can see that I have spritzed the paint with water and it's good to go.  The photo below shows how the paint reacts to more water and both are good, it is a simple mater of personal preference.  


I like to place the tag straight down on the paint and move my fingers around the tag, much as you would do with a stamp to get equal pressure on the ink.  The difference is that if the tag moves it's ok - that's even better.



 Here are three examples of  how the paint will look different depending on how you treat it. 

#1 on the far left -  place the tag straight down on the paint walking your fingers around the tag and then lift straight up.  You can see how the colors are smooshed (technical term).

#2 in the center - place the tag straight down on the paint, walk your fingers around, then pull downward (just a little) and lift straight up.  You can see how the colors move together.

#3 on the far right -place the tag straight down on the paint, walk your fingers around and pull downward a little more than in example 2 and lift straight up.  More of a marble effect.
         

#4 shown above - (my personal favorite) I took sample #3 from above while it was still wet - spritzed it with lots of water.  The spritzing makes the paint move around and some even runs off the tag.  The colors are still separate but much more subtle. The thing I love about these paints is that they never become muddy.  The colors blend but hold true to their original color.

If you like more movement in your paint, you can always swipe it through the paint or even twist it before you pick it up.  If you don't get complete coverage with the first application, simply put the tag back in the paint.


#5 This tag was placed on the paint and then twisted before lifting

#6  This tag was placed next to the paint and then pulled through it.

You are never going to get the same results twice - so "embrace imperfection" and go for it.  By the time you add Distress Ink and maybe some water splats, you'll be happy with your tag.


You can let the tags air dry of course but I have found that if your paper is very wet it tends to curve upward in the center. This makes the paint puddle on the edges and you  get a dark line of paint on both sides.  You can see that in example 2 above.  The best way to minimize this is to use the heat gun and dry it right away.

Another thing to remember is that once the paint has dried, it is there to stay, it will not react again no matter how much water you put on it.  You can add paint on top of the surface as shown below.

I'm going to switch colors on you now - I made this tag but was not happy with so much red and pink.  I wanted to add some blue so when the tag was completely dry I added some Broken China.


 
Much better!!
 
Unlike DI which is translucent, these backgrounds are going to be opaque.  When dry they will no longer react with water so you can add to them without changing the paint surface.
 
So there you have the basics of Distress Paint backgrounds but if you care to stay awhile longer I will show you some other ways of using them.  You can certainly use them as they are and they will be beautiful but below are a few samples of the same tags after some small additions.
 
Below are the before and after of the same three tags shown above.  I will do my best to tell you exactly what I did with them.  As you will see, even if you are not thrilled with your tag at first, you can turn it into something useful.
 


I intentionally tried to change the colors so you would see that any tag can be saved.  Even though Distress Ink was added, the paint maintained it's original opacity.
 
#1 I used Peacock Feathers DI over the entire surface and then edged with some Mowed Lawn.  I left this one as is but you will be seeing it in a future challenge.
 
#2  I stenciled with the Ruler Stencil and the Honeycomb Stencil both in Black Soot DI.  Then I added some Dusty Concord DI around the edge, next came a sprinkle of water.  When that was dry I added some white Distress Paint in random splats.
 
#3  I stamped this one with two stamps from Tim's stamp sets Time Traveler and Remnants.  I stamped in black and embossed with clear embossing powder.  I dry embossed the top part of the tag with Tim's Clock Texture Fade and then edged with Evergreen Bough DI and finally stenciled with the clock stencil.
 
I hope that you have picked up some good information and that you will give this technique a try.  I am going to end with a tag made by "the man" himself.  Tim gave me this signed tag at CHA in 2013 after he demonstrated the very same technique. Nothing like learning from the master.
 
 
 
 So now I hope you will get busy and smear some paint on a tag. 
 Relax, have fun and get creative. 
 
 
All products mentioned above can be found at  Country View Crafts,
our generous sponsor 
 
  
 

 

 

45 comments:

  1. Hi Sandy you have made this technique very clear with the step by step instructions, thanks. Now I need a stack of tags to play with! The tags at the end look great with the stamps as the background is so subtle. 😊

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    1. Thanks for your nice comment Jan. So glad it was helpful - I look forward to seeing what you make with the technique.

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  2. A brilliant tutorial Sandy showing different ways the paints will work and the fabulous effects you can achieve with them. Like you I love to add several layers to get some mottled looks. Thanks for sharing these ideas and inspiring us to get our paints out xx

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    1. Thanks Brenda - I'm happy that you like it.

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  3. Hi Sandy, what a fab tutorial...thanks for sharing and inspiring, XX

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    1. So nice of you to comment Carole - we love to inspire!!!

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    1. So glad I have inspired you - thanks for the nice comment.

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  5. Great tutorial Sandy, thank you. Great to the process and variety of effects. Nikki xx

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    1. Thanks for you nice words Nikki - glad you enjoyed it.

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  6. Fabulous tutorial S@ndy with such clear step by step photos! This is one of my favourite techniques and you have just inspired me to take my paints out again and have another play! And you lucky thing actually owning a tag by the master himself!

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    1. Thanks Astrid - I'm sure you will make something wonderful with the technique. Tim is always so sweet to share his talents and art pieces. I'm very lucky indeed to own one of his tags.

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  7. Great tutorial, I love my distress paints and love layering with inks and water for just great effects....great step by steps to inside and how cool to own a real Tim Tag! Lucky you xx

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    1. Thanks Trace and welcome back - I am a lucky girl to have one of Tim's tags.

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  8. What a fabulous tutorial Sandy, so many variations explained with fabulous results, thank you! Chris xxx

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    1. My pleasure Chris - so happy that you enjoyed it.

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  9. So many fabulous tips on this great tutorial Sandy. Love seeing all the different effects and the way you've developed the tags too. Thanks so much for sharing. Jenny x

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    1. Thanks for your nice comments - so nice to have encouraging words from the team.

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  10. This is a brilliant tutorial S@ndy, love the photos and all the tips you give - you have made me want to play! Thanks so much for the inspiration. Anne xx

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    1. Thanks Anne. Go for it and get some paint on your fingers!!!

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  11. Beautifully explained Sandy. Appreciate ur patience in doing this detaled post, very informative. The tags look stunning. Thanks.

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    1. Thanks for your nice comments. It was fun and I love sharing.

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  12. Thanks for the wonderful tutorial. Very inspiring.
    Thanks for your inspiration Anneke
    www.annekescardart.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks, so glad you are feeling inspired. It's fun, give it a whirl.

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  13. Sandy... Your tutorial on marbling with Distress Paints is wonderful! Great tips, photographs and step by step instructions. I know this took time to photograph and write the blog post. So, thank you so much for your time and expertise. <3 Candy

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    1. Thanks Candy - always enjoy your nice comments. It is time well spent - I love to be helpful.

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  14. Brilliant tutorial - with a memory like mine I know I'll be coming back here! Thanks so much for the details with each photo! Now.......I'm off to find me some tags! Chris:)

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    1. Isn't that the wonderful thing about the internet? We will always be here - look forward to seeing your tags.

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  15. Thank you so much sandy for this post!! I had just about given up with my paints but gave it one more go after reading your advice- result today and something that I liked and could work with!!! Fabulous tutorial and will definitely now try to keep using them
    catherine

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    1. Your comments make me so happy Catherine. It is our aim to be helpful - so glad you had good results.

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  16. A wonderful and inspiring tutorial Sandy. Loved the colours you used....how fab to have a tag made by Tim himself............TFS and hugs
    Annie x

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    1. Thanks Annie - my favorite color combo. I am one lucky girl to have a "Tim Tag"

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  17. Thanks for the tutorial - it's always good to have these to refer back to!

    Sally

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    1. Thanks for the nice comment Sally. Come back anytime.

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  18. This is a fabulous tutorial Sandy and so well explained with the photographs. Mo x

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    1. Thank you for taking the time to comment Mo. So happy you like it.

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  19. Thanks for such a detailed tutorial it was good to see the different effects.

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    1. Thanks for commenting - it is my pleasure to share.

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  20. Great tutorial Sandy! I actually do struggle with this technique, so I guess I need more practice! Love the backgrounds!

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    1. Many thanks Terry, don't give up - you may surprise yourself in a good way.

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  21. Brilliant! Great tutorial, especially like the top tip with drying as you can have something you really like, turn your back for a split second and the effect as dripped off into a muddy mess!!

    Fab colours, so vibrant and lovely marble effects

    Jools x

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    1. Thanks for your great comments Jools - that heat tool can become a crafters best friend.

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  22. Thanks so much Sandy for a terrific tutorial. A pleasure to learn with you. Nicola x

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    2. oops, that should be pleasure!!

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